Brahmacharya (Misleading descriptions of a woman’s beauty)

Brahmacharya (/ˌbrɑːməˈtʃɑːrjə/; Devanagari: ब्रह्मचर्य) literally means “going after Brahman (Supreme Reality, Self or God)“.[1] In Indian religions, it is also a concept with various context-driven meanings.

In one context, brahmacharya is the first of four ashrama (age-based stages) of a human life, with grihastha (householder), vanaprastha (forest dweller), and sannyasa (renunciation) being the other three asramas. The brahmacharya (bachelor student) stage of one’s life, up to twenty-five years of age, was focused on education and included the practice of celibacy.[2] In this context, it connotes chastity during the student stage of life for the purposes of learning from a guru (teacher), and during later stages of life for the purposes of attaining spiritual liberation (moksha).[3][4]

In another context, brahmacharya is the virtue of celibacy when unmarried and fidelity when married.[5][6] It represents a virtuous lifestyle that also includes simple living, meditation and other behaviors.[7][8]

In the Hindu, Jain, and Buddhist monastic traditions, brahmacharya implies, among other things, the mandatory renunciation of sex and marriage.[9] It is considered necessary for a monk’s spiritual practice.[10] Western notions of the religious life as practiced in monastic settings mirror these characteristics.

Misleading descriptions of a woman’s beauty

Poets have exaggerated the beauty of ladies. They are misguided persons who put young men on the wrong path. Descriptions like “damsels with bewitching eyes”, “face like the moon”, “rosy cheeks and honeyed lips” are false and imaginary. Where is the beauty in the dead body, in old women, in sick ladies? Where is the beauty when a lady is infuriated? You are aware of this and yet you cling to their bodies! Are you not confirmed fools! This is due to the force of Maya. How mysterious is the power of Maya and Moha! The beauty of a woman is false, artificial and decaying. Real beauty is undecaying and eternal. The Atman is the source of all beauties. His beauty is everlasting and undecaying. It is ornaments, silken clothing with fanciful borders, dressing of the hair with golden hairpins, flowers, application of powder to their faces, lipstick to the lips and unguent to their eyes that lend a temporary decoration and artificial glittering to the women. Deprive them of their face powders, their ornaments and gaudy dress, and ask them to wear a simple white cloth without any border. Where is the beauty now? The beauty of the skin is a delusion only.

Poets describe in their fanciful, passionate moods that honey flows from the lips of a young, beautiful lady. Is this really true? What do you actually see? The stinking pus from the sockets of the teeth that are affected with dreadful pyorrhoea, the nasty and abdominal sputum from the throat, and foul saliva dribbling on the lips at night—do you call all this as honey and nectar? And yet, the passionate, lustful and sex-intoxicated man swallows these filthy excretions when he is under the sway of excitement! Is there anything more revolting than this? Are not these poets culpable, when they have given such a false description, when they have caused great havoc and damage to passionate young men?

Behind the shining skin there is the raw flesh. Behind the smiles of a young lady are hidden frown and anger. Behind the rosy lips lie germs of diseases. Behind the gentleness and kind words are hidden harsh words and abuses. Life is fleeting and uncertain, O passionate man! Realize the beauty of the Atman in the heart. The body is the abode for diseases. The net of affection in this world is strengthened by long indulgence. It has entwined its thick knotted twine around your neck.

Minus skin, minus dress, minus ornaments, woman is nothing. Just imagine for a moment that her skin is removed. You will have to stand by her side with a long stick to drive away crows and vultures. Physical beauty is superficial, illusory and fading. It is skin-deep. Do not be deluded by external appearances. It is the jugglery of Maya. Go to the source, Atman, the beauty of beauties, the everlasting beauty.

This was a fragment of Brahmacharya,
inspired by burtcoins (Reddit)

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4 thoughts on “Brahmacharya (Misleading descriptions of a woman’s beauty)

  1. I find this type of argument unpersuasive. If a woman were shorn of her skin, she would no longer be beautiful, true. But this is no more than saying “If matters were different to what they are, then they would be different to what they are”. And we fall prey to the fallacy of division. It is not the case that if a thing has a property, then its parts must have that property.

    Not that the conclusion here: really, it’s all just hormones – is wrong.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Thanks for the sensible critique. Me & my neighbor were just preparing to do a little research on this. We got a grab a book from our area library but I think I learned more from this post. I’m very glad to see such excellent information being shared freely out there.

    Liked by 1 person

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